FAQ's

How much time and effort is involved to get my teeth whiter?
Is it really necessary to go to the dentist every six months?
How Do I Prevent Cavities?
Tongue Piercing – Is it Really Cool?
What causes tooth loss?
What are the warning signs of oral cancer?


How much time and effort is involved to get my teeth whiter?

Because of the options available today, you can have your whitening completed in one visit to the dental office or in a week or two in your home on your own schedule. There are several options and it's best to discuss your expectations with your Great Expressions Dental Center dentist. He/she can help you decide on which method will be right for you. All bleaching or whitening will require touch up treatments in the future depending on your habits.

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Is it really necessary to go to the dentist every six months?

YES!! For many people, once every six months is not often enough! Besides checking for cavities, your dentist is evaluating the health of your gums, possible presence of gum disease which may harbor bacteria or infection that could create other health problems. Your head and neck region are examined for infection and oral cancer. ! Many diseases of the body show symptoms and signs in the oral cavity. To insure the best preventative care for you and your body at least twice a year is recommended.

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How Do I Prevent Cavities?

Good oral hygiene removes bacteria and the left over food particles that combine to create cavities. For infants, use a wet gauze or clean washcloth to wipe the plaque from teeth and gums. Avoid putting your child to bed with a bottle filled with anything other than water. See "Baby Bottle Tooth Decay" for more information.

For older children, brush their teeth at least twice a day. Also, watch the number of snacks containing sugar that you give your children.

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends six month visits to the pediatric dentist beginning at your child’s first birthday. Routine visits will start your child on a lifetime of good dental health.

Your pediatric dentist may also recommend protective sealants or home fluoride treatments for your child. Sealants can be applied to your child’s molars to prevent decay on hard to clean surfaces.

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Tongue Piercing – Is it Really Cool?

You might not be surprised anymore to see people with pierced tongues, lips or cheeks, but you might be surprised to know just how dangerous these piercings can be.

There are many risks involved with oral piercings including chipped or cracked teeth, blood clots, or blood poisoning. Your mouth contains millions of bacteria, and infection is a common complication of oral piercing. Your tongue could swell large enough to close off your airway!

Common symptoms after piercing include pain, swelling, infection, an increased flow of saliva and injuries to gum tissue. Difficult-to-control bleeding or nerve damage can result if a blood vessel or nerve bundle is in the path of the needle.

So follow the advice of the American Dental Association and give your mouth a break – skip the mouth jewelry.

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What causes tooth loss?

Tooth decay and periodontal disease are the most common causes of tooth loss. Tooth decay takes place when most of the tooth's mineral makeup has been dissolved away and a hole (cavity) has formed. While tooth decay primarily affects children, periodontal disease, or gum disease, affects mostly adults. Periodontal disease is an infection of the gums caused by the buildup of plaque, and its earliest stage is known as gingivitis.

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What are the warning signs of oral cancer?

A Early symptoms of oral cancer include: a sore on the lip, in the mouth, or in the throat that does not heal; a lump on the lip, in the mouth, or in the throat; a red or white patch found anywhere in the mouth; unusual pain or bleeding in the mouth; swelling of the mouth; and any difficulty or discomfort felt in chewing or swallowing.

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